eSchool News

eSchool News covers the intersection of technology and innovation in education.
Updated: 1 hour 34 sec ago

5 core functions of the LMS of the future

Wed, 05/13/2015 - 02:02

New EDUCAUSE report explored the gaps between current LMS functionality and what’s needed for the next-gen digital learning environment.

According to over 70 education IT specialists, current LMS functionality is great for administrative tasks, but doesn’t provide support for the new learning approaches in today’s schools.

The next generation digital learning environment (NGDLE), says a new EDUCAUSE report, will need a “Lego” approach, where components are built that allow individuals and institutions the opportunity to construct learning environments tailored to their requirement and goals.

“What is clear is that the LMS has been highly successful in enabling the administration of learning, but less so in enabling the learning itself,” wrote the report’s authors. “The challenge is to build on the value of an LMS as an administrative tool by retaining what works, but not be bound to an outgoing model of teaching and learning. [This] NGDLE is what should come after the LMS era.”

And according to the report’s authors, there are five core components of the post-LMS, as well as new architectures to consider.

(Next page: 5 core functions)

School day, interrupted

Tue, 05/12/2015 - 15:08

Computer-based testing often putting freeze on classes in Florida’s Miami-Dade, other counties

Business technology teacher Antonio White is supposed to teach middle and high school students how to type on a computer keyboard and use the full suite of Microsoft Office programs.

But on many days, he doesn’t have access to computers. They’ve been usurped for Florida’s standardized testing.

“There’s not a lot of teaching going on this semester. It’s like school is over,” said White, who teaches at José Martí MAST 6-12 Academy.

Ever since the Florida Department of Education mandated that many tests be taken on a computer, school districts have warned that the decree would come with a cost: lots of lost instructional time.
The prediction has come true, according to many teachers, students and parents.

Next page: What educators and administrators say about the challenges